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Ms. Anne Trebilcock

Ms. Anne Trebilcock
Former Legal Adviser
International Labour Organization

Biography Biography in PDF

International Labour Law
The Development of
International Labour Law
What are international labour standards? Why are they needed and how are they used? How do they originate? What is the process involved? How are representatives of employers and of workers involved along with governments in drafting international labour standards in the International Labour Organization? Which subjects do these standards cover? How do they enter into force? As treaties, how can they be revised? What are the contemporary trends in setting international labour standards? What challenges do they face? This introductory lecture addresses these questions and more.

Original Lecture
English
  (47 minutes)

Lecture with simultaneous interpretation
العربية Français Русский Español

Recording facilities courtesy of
International Labour Organization


The Implementation of
International Labour Law
International labour standards set minimum standards that are to be given effect by ratifying member States of the International Labour Organization. They may be implemented by a variety of means. Their application is supported by various ILO supervisory procedures, chiefly the regular supervision of reports by the Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations under articles 19 and 22 of the ILO Constitution, representations and complaints under articles 24 and 26, and complaints brought before the ILO Governing Body Committee on Freedom of Association. Organizations of employers and of workers as well as member States and other international organizations have roles to play. In addition, the Follow-up to the 1998 ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work and the 2008 ILO Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization promote the implementation of principles underlying international labour standards and, in case of ratification, their application by member States. The lecture explores these aspects along with the challenges being faced today.

Video   (42 minutes)

Recording facilities courtesy of
International Labour Organization
International Labour Law
The Development of International Labour Law
A. Legal Instruments
International Labour Organization Constitution, Versailles, April 1919, adopted by the Labour Commission of the Peace Conference (modified by the amendments of 1922, 1945, 1946, 1953, 1962 and 1972).

International Labour Organization, Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy (MNE Declaration), Geneva, November 1977, adopted by the Governing Body of the International Labour Office at its 204th Session (as amended at its 279th Session, November 2000 and 295th Session, March 2006).

International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families, New York, 18 December 1990, United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 2220, p. 3.

International Labour Organization, Marine Labour Convention, Geneva, 23 February 2006.

Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 13 December 2006, United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 2515, p. 3.
B. Documents
Declaration concerning the aims and purposes of the International Labour Organisation (Declaration of Philadelphia), Philadelphia, 10 May 1944 (Annex to the International Labour Organization Constitution).

International Labour Organization, Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization, Geneva, 10 June 2008, adopted by the International Labour Conference at its 97th Session.

ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work, Geneva, 18 June 1998, adopted by the International Labour Conference at its 86th Session (Annex revised 15 June 2010).

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises (2011 version).

International Labour Organization, The ILO and its instruments on HIV and AIDS and the world of work, May 2012.

International Labour Organization, Handbook of procedures relating to international labour Conventions and Recommendations (Rev.2012).
C. Additional References
For more information on the ILO Decent Work Agenda, see the official website.      

For more information on the Millennium Development Goals and the ILO, see the official website.


The Implementation of International Labour Law
A. Legal Instruments
International Labour Organization Constitution, Versailles, April 1919, adopted by the Labour Commission of the Peace Conference (modified by the amendments of 1922, 1945, 1946, 1953, 1962 and 1972).

International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 16 December 1966, United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 993, p. 3.

Convention on the Rights of the Child, New York, 20 November 1989, United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 1577, p. 3.
B. Documents
Declaration concerning the aims and purposes of the International Labour Organisation (Declaration of Philadelphia), Philadelphia, 10 May 1944 (Annex to the International Labour Organization Constitution).

International Labour Organization, Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization, Geneva, adopted by the International Labour Conference at its 97th Session, 10 June 2008.
C. Additional References
For more information on the International Labour Organization mechanisms on applying and promoting international labour standards”, see the official website.

For more information on the International Labour Organization Helpdesk for Business on International Labour Standards, see the official website.

For more information on International Labour Organization databases, see the official website.